Active 20-30 History

Creation of Active 20-30

Our History

Active 20-30 International provides young adults with the opportunity for personal development, friendship and development of their leadership skills while improving the quality of life of children in the communities where we are present.

1922

Active 20-30 International had its beginnings in 1922 when the young people of two American cities very distant from each other, pointed out the need to create a Club of service destined to the adult youth. The members of the service organizations already established in those days were generally older people, noting the absence of young elements.

This observation led these groups of young visionaries to form a different club – a club where young men would have the opportunity to participate actively in the work of service to their community – a club where ideas, enthusiasm, daring and energy, Characteristics of the youth, they would be channeled towards the satisfaction of the social necessities, in a plane of healthy competition with the clubs formed by older men.

The “pioneers” of service clubs for young men resided in Aberdeen, Washington, where Active International was started and in Sacramento, California City where 20-30 International was born.

Both International members and 20-30 International were subsequently converted into founding associations of the World Council of Service clubs for young men. John Armenia, Joe Crowe Scholdt of Active and Dr. James Vernetti, Henry Heyl and Ray Fletcher of 20-30 were among the great promoters of the World Council movement until their formal initiation in 1944.

1959

In 1959, the president of 20-30, Norman Morrison and the president of Activo. Ken Helling, exchanged communications that resurrected the old proposition that these two almost identical groupings of service clubs merged into one.

During the years of 1959 and 1960 several meetings were held between the two groups, culminating in the drafting of the constitution that would govern the nascent institution and with a special resolution recommending the approval of the merger to the assemblies General members and 20-30.

Jack Kummert, Doug Martin and Clint McClure of 20-30 and Victor Smith, Owen Barnes and Jim Robertson of Activo, participated with Norman Morrison and Ken helling in the preliminary negotiations.

During the 20-30 International convention held in Santa Cruz, California in June 1960, delegates unanimously approved the proposition to amalgamate both institutions, adopting the proposed constitution. A month later at the International Active Convention held in Calgar and Alberta, Canada. Identical agreements were taken, preliminaries. During the 20-30 International convention held in Santa Cruz, California in June there are clubs in 16 locations. In 1981 the International statutes were changed changing the existing structure of districts and areas to be converted into national associations of Active 20-30 Clubs, to allow the formation of committees of 1960, the delegates unanimously approved the Proposition to amalgamate both institutions, adopting the proposed constitution. A month later at the International Active Convention held in Calgar and, Alberta, Canada. Identical agreements were taken. Therefore, on August 1, 1960, Active 20-30 were transformed into Active 20-30 International. In October 1960 the first magazine of the new organization appeared.

In the year of the merger, Active 20-30 consisted of 7500 members, members of 365 clubs established in Canada, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, United States, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua and Panama.

To learn more about our history visit the blog Active 20-30 Historical Findings by Michele Spilman.

Active 20-30 International Objective

  • Form leaders for community service.
  • Serve the community and especially the children.
  • Develop drienship and promote fellowship.
  • To promote the highest human, moral and civic principles.

Active 20-30 International Objective

  • Form leaders for community service.
  • Serve the community and especially the children.
  • Develop drienship and promote fellowship.
  • To promote the highest human, moral and civic principles.